Wreck Commissioner's Inquiry

FIRST DAY

 

Continued.

 


Mr. Newcombe - to Mr. Geoffrion: Do you admit service upon the master?

Mr. Geoffrion:
If my learned friend will give me the names of those he claims to have served I will tell him.

Mr. Newcombe:
Do you admit service on H. G. Kendall, master; Edward Jones, first officer, and William Sampson, chief engineer?

Mr. Geoffrion:
Yes.

Mr. Newcombe - to Mr. Duclos: Do you admit service upon Thomas Andersen, master; Alfred Toftenes, first officer; Einar Reinertz, second officer; Jakob Saxe, third officer; L. Syvertsen, chief engineer, and Jakob Singhalsen, third engineer of the Storstadt.

Mr. Duclos:
We admit service.

Lord Mersey:
Will you give us copies of the letter and questions you have read?

Mr. Newcombe:
We will hand them up, Sir. The Empress of Ireland was a British steamship, built by the Fairfield Shipbuilding Company, of Glasgow, in the year 1906. Her length was 548.9 feet, her breadth 65.75 feet, and her depth 41.02 feet. She was rigged as a schooner, and registered at the Port of Liverpool, her official number being 123972, and her tonnage, after deducting 6,162.28 tons for propelling power and crew space, was 8,028.17 registered tons. She was owned by the Canadian Pacific Railway Company, Mr. Arthur Baker, of 62/5 Charing Cross, London, S.W., being the registered manager of the vessel.

A certified copy of the vessel's register, containing the above and other particulars, is produced and handed in. (Document filed and marked Exhibit 'A'). The vessel was built under special survey by the Board of Trade and Lloyds surveyors and evidence as to her class will be produced.

Mr. Aspinall:
I am told that she was classed 100 a-1.

Mr. Newcombe:
Thank you. Copies of the plans are here and will be produced and explained by Mr. Hillhouse, chief naval architect of Fairfields, the builders.

The vessel held a passengers' certificate granted by the Board of Trade, and dated 20th February, 1914, enabling her to carry 1,860 passengers in the foreign trade. The complement of her crew is given as 372 hands. A copy of the Passenger's Certificate, and the declaration of the surveyor upon which it was granted, are handed in. (Document filed and marked as Exhibit 'B').

I should observe that from the declaration of the surveyor, the vessel was fitted with 758 fixed berths for third-class passengers, but was only allowed to carry 714 third-class passengers. The explanation of this is that the vessel was required to carry boats for all. From the Passenger's Certificate it will be seen that she carried 40 boats, capable of accommodating 1,360 persons. With a crew of 372 hands, therefore, the vessel could only accommodate 1,488 passengers, instead of 1,532, for which number fixed berths were fitted. In addition to the 40 lifeboats above referred to the Passenger's Certificate and declaration show that the vessel carried 2,100 life jackets, viz; 1,950 life jackets for adults and 150 life jackets for children. She was also supplied with 18 life buoys, 9 life buoys being fitted with lights.

The Passenger's Certificate referred to, dated 14th February, 1914, remained in force, unless previously cancelled, until the 7th February, 1915. The surveyor who made the survey and signed the declaration was Mr. J. Dow, one of the Board of Trade engineers and ship surveyors. The vessel was also surveyed and passed by the Board of Trade surveyors as an Emigrant ship. On the 15th May last, the vessel was cleared as an Emigrant ship at Liverpool by the Board of Trade Emigration officer, and the reports of the survey then made will be found in the copy of the report of survey signed by the officers who made them, which I produce and put in. (Document filed and marked Exhibit 'C'). It appears that on this occasion 16 boats were swung out and the surveyor who saw this done testifies that he was satisfied that the ship was in all respects fit for the intended voyage and that the requirements of the Merchant Shipping Acts had been complied with. On leaving Liverpool on the 15th of May last, as an emigrant ship, the report of the survey shows that the vessel carried:

 

Persons.

16 steel boats under davits accommodating

764

20 wood and canvas Engelhardt boats accommodating

920

4 wood and canvas Berthon boats accommodating

176
  ________

40 boats accommodation

1,860

She carried 2,212 life belts, 150 childrens' life belts and 24 life buoys. The surveyor certifies that the ship was supplied with all the life-saving appliances.

I am able to produce a copy of the Canadian Pacific Railway Company's Regulations and Instructions in book form, issued by them to their masters and officers, and which were the instructions prevailing as between Captain Kendall and his Company upon the occasion of this voyage. There are a number of these Rules which it might be important 

Lord Mersey:
What rules?

Mr. Newcombe:
The regulations issued by the company to their masters. Would your Lordship desire me to read any of these?

Lord Mersey:
You might let us have three copies, one for each of us. I do not think it is material that you should read them.

Mr. Newcombe:
I might make a brief reference to indicate their general character.

Lord Mersey:
Are you instructed to make any complaint at all as to the construction, condition or equipment of the Empress of Ireland?

Mr. Newcombe:
No, My Lord, I have no such instructions.

Lord Mersey:
Then, if you are not going to make any complaint, I do not think it is necessary that you should deal with these matters in detail.

Mr. Newcombe:
Very well, My Lord. Then, that brings me to the question of witnesses.

Lord Mersey:
It ought to bring you first to the question of the navigation of the two ships which led to the disaster.

Mr. Newcombe:
I propose to show that, by calling the navigating officer.

Lord Mersey:
If you would rather, in opening up that part of your case, leave it to the witnesses to put the case before us you are quite right in doing so.

Mr. Newcombe:
The Tribunal will understand that counsel have come here from various quarters and that last evening, after the arrival of the train, was perhaps the first occasion upon which they had had an opportunity of exchanging views. There has been the utmost harmony between counsel and everybody has been anxious to give all information to assist in elucidating the facts. I have had handed to me since I came into Court, for the reason that it could not be prepared earlier because of the lack of typewriters, etc., a statement of the testimony which will be offered by the captain of the Norwegian boat and following that there will be other statements from that side very shortly. My learned friend, Mr. Meredith, was good enough to give me last evening a short statement of the position as it will be testified to by Captain Kendall and his officers, as I understand. This is rather a summary of the situation than a brief of the statement. Under these circumstances, subject to the direction of the Tribunal, I would call Captain Kendall.

Lord Mersey:
I see by this Act of Parliament that the commissioners, before doing anything, are required to take and subscribe to an oath. Is that a provision that is in force? I am only asking you, Mr. Newcombe, as a representative of the Government and, if so, I want to know who is going to administer the oath. I am referring to the repealing section which, as I understand, is re-enacted in the later Act. It is section 786. Mr. Aspinall, do you know anything about this oath which we are supposed to take?

Mr. Aspinall:
My Lord, I know nothing about it. But, my Lord, might I be allowed to take this opportunity of expressing, on behalf of the directors of the Canadian Pacific Railway Company, our profound sympathy with the relatives of those unfortunate people who lost their lives on the occasion of this casualty? Having said that, I might add that I do not know whether it would be convenient for your Lordships to see the statement or summary of our case to which Mr. Newcombe has referred. We have drawn up this summary and last night we handed it to Mr. Newcombe, and it appears to me it would be probably of very great assistance to make use of it in following the evidence which is about to be given.

Lord Mersey:
Yes, Mr. Aspinall, probably it would be of the greatest assistance, but first of all I want to get this question of the oath cleared up.

Mr. Aspinall:
Well, my Lord, my learned friend, Mr, Holden, who is associated with me in this case, thinks he can give your Lordships some information upon that point.

Mr. Holden:
My Lord, the section of our Canadian Shipping Act referring to this matter is Section 786, and reads as follows; this section was enacted in 1908, and as I said, reads as follows:

786. Every commissioner and assessor, before entering upon his duties, shall take and subscribe an oath well, faithfully and impartially to execute the duties assigned to him by this Part.

As we understand it, the Commission is acting under that Statute, and, therefore, affected by that section and by all other sections of the Act that may be applicable.

Lord Mersey:
Now then, Mr. Holden, can you tell me something more - who is to administer the oath?

Mr. Holden:
I am sorry, my Lord, but I do not find anything in the Statute that covers that.

Mr. Newcombe:
I have sent out for the Interpretation Act, my Lord, I think there may be something in that which will guide us.

Lord Mersey:
Do you understand that the administration of this oath is a condition precedent to our hearing the case, because if so let us take it at once.

Mr. Holden:
When I said, my Lord, that I did not find anything in the Statute as to who should administer the oath, I did not mean to say that under our Canadian law no one is qualified to administer the oath. I know that there are officials who are qualified, and I merely meant that the Shipping Act did not seem to make any provision for the administration of the oath.

Lord Mersey:
Yes, but you said that the administration of this oath is a condition precedent to our undertaking this inquiry.

Mr. Holden:
Yes, my Lord, that is our understanding of the law.

Lord Mersey:
Then we had better take the oath at once. It cannot do any harm anyway.

Mr. Newcombe:
I find here in Section 25 of the Interpretation Act of the Revised Statutes of Canada, 1906, the following:

25. Whenever by any Act of Parliament or by a rule of the Senate or House of Commons or by an order, regulation, or commission made or issued by the Governor in Council, under any law authorizing him to require the taking of evidence under oath, evidence under oath is authorized or required to be taken, or an oath is authorized or directed to be made, taken, or administered, the oath may be administered and a certificate of its having been made, taken or administered may be given by anyone authorized by the Act, rule, order, regulation, or commission to take the evidence, Or by a judge of any court, a notary public, a justice of the peace, or a commissioner for taking affidavits, having authority or jurisdiction within the place where the oath is administered.

Therefore, your Lordships may take the oath before any of the officers, named in this Act.

Lord Mersey:
Yes it would appear that any of the officers mentioned in this Act have authority to administer the oath. Are you a justice of the peace, Mr. Newcombe?

Mr. Newcombe:
No, your Lordship, I have not that honour.

Lord Mersey:
Well, is there anyone here who is?

Mr. Newcombe:
Do I understand that your Lordship prefers to be sworn before a justice of the peace?

Lord Mersey:
I do not in the least mind before whom I take the oath, but I do mind about this: it seems to be in order, and I wish to be sworn.

Mr. Newcombe:
I understand that Judge Langelier, who is a judge of the sessions, is present, and as such has the authority to administer the oath.

Lord Mersey:
You say that by this statute he has the authority to administer the oath?

Mr. Newcombe:
Yes, my Lord.

Lord Mersey:
Then let us be sworn.

(At this point Lord Mersey, Sir Adolphe Routhier, and Chief Justice McLeod took the statutory oath before Judge Langelier of the Court of the Sessions of the Peace.)

Lord Mersey:
Now we take it, Mr. Newcombe, that you now put in the documents that have been produced before the oath was taken by the members of the Court?

Mr. Newcombe:
Yes, my Lord, with the permission of the Court the documents will be taken as having been filed subsequent to the taking of the oath.

Lord Mersey:
Now, Mr. Newcombe, doesn't the Statute provide also that the assessors should be sworn?

Mr. Newcombe:
Yes, my Lord, it does.

Lord Mersey:
Then let them be sworn.

(The assessors were duly sworn according to the statutory form of oath, before Judge Langelier.)

Mr. Aspinall:
My Lord, I have two further copies of that statement which I handed in, and I am having others made so that the Assessors will also be provided with them.

Lord Mersey:
Do I understand that you had handed in copies for the Court?

Mr. Aspinall:
Yes, my Lord.

Lord Mersey:
Well I must say that for myself I did not see it.

Mr. Aspinall:
I was wishful that your Lordship should have it. May I now hand in two more copies for the Assessors. My Lord, that document is a brief and I hope a succinct statement of the facts which we are going to present to the Court as being the material facts which led up to this collision.

Lord Mersey:
Of course it is not evidence.

Mr. Aspinall:
No, my Lord, it is not evidence.

Lord Mersey:
It is a statement of the theory you are about to put forward and the facts on which it is based?

Mr. Aspinall:
Yes, my Lord, I will read it to the Court. The statement is as follows:

Between one a.m. and two a.m. May twenty-ninth, 1914, the Empress of Ireland, a twin-screw steamship of 14,191 tons gross, and 8,023 tons net register, 562 feet in length, was in the River St. Lawrence, on the south side of the river, a few miles below Father Point.

She was in the course of a voyage from Quebec to Liverpool, carrying passengers, mails and general cargo and manned by a crew of 420 hands all told.

Having shortly before dropped her pilot, she was on the course of North 50 E. by compass, and was making about 17 knots an hour through the water. A good lookout was being kept on board of her, and her regulation lights were duly exhibited and burning brightly. Her master, first and third officers, were on the bridge.

In those circumstances those on board the Empress of Ireland sighted the masthead lights of a steamer, which proved to be the Storstad, on the starboard bow, and distant several miles.

Shortly afterwards, the course was altered to N. 76 E., on which course the Empress of Ireland was steadied, and she proceeded on, still having the masthead lights of the Storstad on her starboard bow.

A little later the green light of the Storstad was sighted on the starboard bow of the Empress of Ireland, and very shortly afterwards a fog bank was seen coming off the land, whereupon the engines of the Empress of Ireland were stopped and reversed full speed, and her whistle was blown three short blasts.

The fog shut out the lights of the Storstad. A prolonged blast of the Storstad's whistle was heard on the starboard bow of the Empress of Ireland. The whistle of the Empress of Ireland was again blown three short blasts. A long blast from the Storstad was again heard on the starboard bow of the Empress of Ireland. At about this time, the Empress of Ireland being stopped in the water, her engines were stopped and two long blasts were sounded on the whistle. Another long blast was heard from the Storstad, still on the starboard bow. The whistle of the Empress of Ireland was again sounded two long blasts.

Very soon afterwards the mashead light and the two side lights of the Storstad were seen close to, broad on the starboard bow of the Empress of Ireland, approaching at fast speed.

The master of the Empress of Ireland, by megaphone, hailed the Storstad to go full speed astern, and at about the same time the Storstad was heard to sound three short blasts.

In the hope of possibly avoiding or minimising the effect of the collision, the engines of the Empress of Ireland were ordered full speed ahead, and her Helm was ordered to be put hard aport, but the Storstad, continuing to come on fast, struck the Empress of Ireland between the funnels, and penetrated through her steel decks to the extent of fifteen to twenty feet.

The engines of the Empress of Ireland were immediately stopped, and the Storstad was requested by megaphone to go full speed ahead, but the ships separated, and thereupon an attempt was made to go ahead with a view of beaching her, but the Empress of Ireland, which was listing heavily to starboard, continued to list, and shortly afterwards sank.

Now, my Lord, in view of the fact that we have prepared this document which I have just read I am not making any complaint of unfair treatment, but at the same time it seems to me that it would only be fair that those who represent the Storstad should do the same thing as soon as they conveniently can.

Mr. Newcombe:
I am assured that they will.

Mr. Aspinall:
I am quite content with that assurance.

Lord Mersey:
Mr. Duclos, how soon will you be in a position to furnish the court with a statement on behalf of the Storstad, setting forth their case?

Mr. Duclos:
We can make an informal verbal statement at the present moment, but we had intended to go perhaps a little further and communicate to Mr. Newcombe a short statement of the evidence that we proposed to give by each individual witness whose testimony would be tendered. We have already put one or two of them in Mr. Newcombe's hands, and during the course of the morning we expect to have the rest.

Lord Mersey:
That is not quite what I want. Have you read this statement put forward by the Canadian Pacific Railway Company on behalf of the Empress of Ireland, Mr. Duclos?

Mr. Duclos:
No, my Lord.

Lord Mersey:
Have you another copy, Mr. Aspinall?

Mr. Aspinall:
I am afraid I have exhausted all I have, my Lord.

Lord Mersey:
Then you may have mine. Now, Mr. Duclos, will you be good enough to read it, and we will wait while you are reading it.

Mr. Duclos - after a few moments:
I have read it now, my Lord.

Lord Mersey:
Now, how soon can you furnish us with a similar statement on behalf of the Storstad?

Mr. Duclos:
At the adjournment of the Court or on resuming this afternoon.

Lord Mersey:
You mean to say . . . . we shall adjourn at one o'clock and we shall reassemble at two . . . . now do I understand that at two o'clock you will be in a position to give us a statement?

Mr. Haight:
Well, my Lord, it has taken the only stenographer we could get two hours this morning to type four pages, so I am afraid the difficulty will be one of stenographic assistance.

Lord Mersey:
Oh, not a bit of it. There are only two and a half pages in this statement handed in by the Canadian Pacific Railway Company, and if there is any difficulty in getting it written I will write it out for you myself. You ought to be able to put your story down at once. 

Mr. Newcombe:
If your Lordship will permit me for a moment, it occurs to me that the stenographers should be sworn on an occasion of this kind.

Lord Mersey:
Oh, by all means.

(At this point Messrs. T. P. Owens, A. W. G. Macalister, and E. C. Young, were sworn as official reporters.)

Mr. Haight:
If your Lordship prefers we will have a written statement by two o'clock, but we may have to put it in in handwriting.

Lord Mersey:
Well, we would rather have it at once.

Mr. Haight:
Then I will make it verbally.

Lord Mersey:
Very well.

Mr. Haight:
The steamship Storstad was running on time charter for the Dominion Coal Company, and on the morning of the collision was on a voyage from Sydney to Montreal, with a cargo of 10,800 tons of coal. She was abreast of Metis Point at one-thirty a.m. Sydney time; our engine-room and deck-clock having been set at Sydney time, and not having been changed.

Lord Mersey:
What is the difference between Sydney time and the time on board the Empress?

Mr. Haight:
Well, Montreal and Sydney time differ by one hour.

Lord Mersey:
In which way?

Mr. Haight:
One-thirty by our clock was two-thirty by Montreal time. (This statement was afterwards corrected by Mr. Haight.) When abreast of Metis Point, and about four miles off the shore, we laid a course W. ¼ S. magnetic, and ran on our patent log six knots. That indicated only our distance run through the water. The tide had been at low water at about ten o'clock, and would have been at high water at about four in the morning. At this hour, the flood had run about two-thirds, and the officers of the Storstad estimate that with that tide the current of the river running out was approximately one knot an hour. There has, therefore, to be a slight allowance made by virtue of the current in connection with our readings of the patent log; but by the patent log we ran W. ¼ S. six knots. The course was then changed to W. ½ S., and we ran by our parent log five knots. The lights at Cock Point and Father Point were visible when we had run that second course, and shortly after that the log was taken in as being no longer necessary.

After running the five knots W. ½ S. our course was changed W. by S. Just before the change was made, or just after, the masthead lights of the Empress of Ireland were seen on our port bow, bearing in the neighbourhood of two or a little more than two points away. At that time, she was showing only her masthead lights.

Lord Mersey:
At what distance was she?

Mr. Haight:
Probably six or seven knots away, and too far off for her coloured lights to show. About six or seven minutes after we had made out her masthead lights, we first saw a coloured light, and it was green. She ran showing her green light for a short interval, and then we saw a change in her course. Her range lights came together - they had before been somewhat open to start with - and she showed both the green and the red. She then continued to swing to starboard, shut out the green and showed the red light only. The witnesses are not exact, nor do they all agree precisely as to how long the red light of the Empress was showing before the fog shut her out. According to different stories, it was from two to four or five minutes that she continued showing her red light when the fog shut her out from their view, but when she was so shut out the red light was still showing.

After the fog had shut the Empress off, she blew us a signal of one whistle.

The fog had not yet surrounded our boat, but we answered that signal, and when she was shut out our engines were ordered slow.

Mr. Newcombe:
Was that a long or a short signal?

Mr. Haight:
A long fog whistle was the first whistle blown by the Empress, and we blew a similar whistle. About two minutes after the fog shut her out and we slowed, the fog enveloped us, and we rang our engines to stop. The entries in our engine room log are 'three slow three-two, stop.' After our engines had been stopped there was a second exchange of long blasts between the two steamers.

Lord Mersey:
Meaning?

Mr. Haight:
One long blast - the running whistle in a fog.

Chief Justice McLeod:
There was an exchange of just one blast between the two ships?

Mr. Haight:
Yes, one blast. A little later, we heard a signal of three whistles blown by the Empress of Ireland. To that we again blew one long whistle.

Lord Mersey:
Meaning what?

Mr. Haight:
Simply that we were under way and blowing a long running whistle as required by the regulations.

Lord Mersey:
Does that mean you are keeping your course?

Mr. Haight:
Yes, my Lord. The vessel was still heading west by south. A little later, the Chief Officer of the Storstad, in order to make sure of ample room, says that he ordered the wheel ported. His statement is that he had no idea of danger, that he had seen the boat go into the fog bearing red to red to him, but that his engines were stopped and he was slowing down, and didn't want to take any chances of his boat sheering one way or another, and if he was going to change at all he wanted to change to starboard. The wheel, when put to port, had no influence upon our course. It was then put hard-a-port. The third officer, who was also on watch and on the bridge, himself helped put the wheel over to be sure it should go all the way. Still the Storstad would not swing, and then, because we had found that our vessel had lost steerage-way, the third officer pulled the whistle-cord, blowing a signal of two long blasts as required by the regulations, to mean that our vessel was not under steerage way. About the same time he blew the two whistles, in order that his vessel might not become entirely unmanageable, he gave a signal on the telegraph 'slow ahead', and he whistled down the speaking-tube to the Captain. The Captain, when he turned in, had said 'if we run into any fog, call me,' and those were his regular instructions anyway.

The First Officer, when he called the Captain, said, 'it is getting foggy.' The Captain said, 'Can you see Father Point?' The Chief Officer replied, 'It has just been shut off.' No mention was made of any vessels in the vicinity. The mate's statement is that he did not think there was the slightest cause for danger or anxiety, and simply called the master because he had been told to call him if they encountered fog. The master went on the bridge, looked at the compass first, says he had no idea there was a vessel in the vicinity then, they were steering west by south, and an instant later saw a masthead light about three points or perhaps a little more on its port bow. He instantly ordered the engines full speed astern.

The distance between the vessels is estimated by the master - and it is a pure estimate - at perhaps 800 feet. Immediately after the masthead light showed, he saw the green light. Probably a minute, or perhaps somewhat over a minute, after the Empress was first seen the boats came together. The angle was something less than a right angle, the starboard side of the Empress making an angle with the starboard side of the Storstad of perhaps three points.

The master of the Storstad heard a hail from the Empress to keep going ahead or to go ahead full speed. He had no megaphone, and he called back, 'I am going ahead full speed,' and instantly ordered his engines full speed ahead at the moment the vessels came together. He states, however, that it was absolutely impossible for him to keep his stand in the wound, that from an angle of about three points his bow was swung to starboard until the vessels came almost parallel; that he was swung around so much he was afraid the starboard quarter of the Empress would hit his port bow, and then the Empress went off into the fog. He was swung so far to starboard that in order to bring his heading back towards the land he set his helm hard a-port, ordered his engines ahead, and made a complete circle. He blew a number of signals to the Empress trying to get an answer to find where she was. He got no answer at all. It was perhaps eight or ten minutes after the collision before he got his first idea of her whereabouts, while he was manoeuvring, and then he heard cries from the people who were in the water, a chorus of cries, not an individual cry - he was not quite close enough for that. He manoeuvred his vessel as close to the vicinity of the Empress as he dared. His boats were all ready to drop and the moment he was in a position to do so all four boats were sent away. Our vessel rescued several hundred of the passengers. The members of the crew of the Storstad manned entirely one of the Empress boats after it came to the Storstad when she went back the second time, and partially manned another boat.

I do not know that your Lordships are perhaps interested in further details as to what was done.

Lord Mersey:
Personally, I do not think we are. We have the story of the navigation. Have you followed it, Mr. Aspinall.

Mr. Aspinall:
Yes, my Lord, I have.

Lord Mersey:
Very well, we are much obliged for your statement, Mr. Haight. Now, do I understand that it is proposed to call Captain Kendall?

Mr. Haight:
If your Lordship will pardon me for a moment, I have a correction that I wish to make. One-thirty Montreal time is two-thirty Sydney time, just a transposition of the hours. It is the other way about. I must apologize for not being more familiar with Canadian time.

Lord Mersey:
Then, Mr. Newcombe, if you are ready to proceed with the examination of Captain Kendall, he might be sworn.

Mr. Aspinall:
My Lord, I should be delighted to assist Mr. Newcombe in the examination of Captain Kendall, as I am familiar with the evidence that the Captain will give.

Mr. Newcombe:
I should be only too glad.

Mr. Aspinall:
Subject, of course, to this, that after the cross-examination of Captain Kendall by Mr. Haight, on behalf of the Storstad, I should have an opportunity of re-examining Captain Kendall if it be necessary.

Lord Mersey:
Certainly.

 

WITNESS.

Henry George Kendall - Captain - ss. Empress of Ireland.
Testimony

 

The Commission resumed at 2.15 p.m.

Mr. Newcombe:
In mentioning the appearances this morning, I unfortunately omitted to inform the tribunal that Mr. Vaux, of the Board of Trade, has come out under instructions of the Board of Trade to assist in the preparation and submission of the case.

Lord Mersey:
I understand that.

WITNESSES.

Henry George Kendall - Captain - ss. Empress of Ireland.
Testimony - Resumed

Alfred Severin Gensen Toftenes - Chief Officer - ss. Storstad.
Testimony

(Mr. George Simpson was sworn as Official Reporter).

 

The Commission adjourned at 5.15 to meet at 10 a.m. Wednesday, June 17.